The Land Report scoop made headlines. Many stories focused on #Gates’ longstanding interest in climate change and sustainability and suggested those concerns might be driving the land purchases.

By James B. Meigs
February 27, 2021
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Newsweek called him a “sustainable agriculture champion.”

Those stories dovetailed with earlier reports about Gates’ large land acquisitions in Arizona. Most notably, in 2017, the Gates-affiliated Mt. Lemmon Holdings invested in some 40 square miles of “transitional” land on the western fringe of the Phoenix sprawl. 

Some partners in the Arizona project issued a press release touting plans to build “a forward-thinking community … that embraces cutting-edge technology.” There was talk of “high-speed digital networks” and “autonomous logistics hubs.” That was all it took for many in the media to conclude that Gates was personally engineering the city of the future.

“Bill Gates has started laying out his plans for creating a ‘smart city’ in Phoenix, Arizona,” science-news outlet Futurism wrote. This high-tech metropolis “could be both a breeding and testing ground for futuristic technologies.”

In reality, the idea that Bill Gates was single-handedly reinventing farming — or designing cities of tomorrow — was almost entirely speculation.

“There’s a tendency in the media to personalize this,” O’Keefe says. “People want to know, ’Why does Bill Gates want all this land?’ ”

But hyper-wealthy people like Gates don’t make every decision personally, O’Keefe notes. “He has very competent investment managers.”

Given that Gates is the third-richest person in the world — with an estimated net worth of $132 billion, he falls in behind Tesla founder Elon Musk and Amazon’s Jeff Bezos — those money managers have their hands full.

Makary added that there has been “a 63 percent increase in #overdoses.

Twenty-three percent of all emergency room visits at one point last year were from mental illness complaints.”

“This is the first of many studies that’s going to tell us that many of these policies were basically an abuse by one group that has power over another group, and they exercise that power unfairly just because they could.”

Makary described the “fundamental problem” with accountability for locking down as a result of having “not looked at the totality of data on the health of kids and health consequences.”

He explained:

“If you were to ask me if you left your home could you get bacterial meningitis, the answer will always be yes; but if people stay isolated there will be more health consequences against that individual, and as a scientist, you’ve got to look at the totality of data on health outcomes. Those CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) guidelines that came out, Tucker, they were flawed. They were filled with dogma, they contradicted top CDC scientists who published in the journal the American Medical Association three weeks prior that schools don’t significantly contribute to transmission, and if they were applied to the airline industry, every plane in the U.S. would be grounded. Why is it that adults get to pack into planes, and they do it safely with masks, but kids are last in the reopening plan? That is an abuse of power.”

Carlson added that the reason for keeping schools shut is not the science, as has been demonstrated, but rather it is on account of the teachers’ unions that have “inordinate political power.”

Fox News senior political analyst Brit Hume told Carlson that “as powerful as I thought they (teachers’ unions) were, I did not realize they were powerful enough to do what they’ve succeeded in doing.”

“We saw the most recent manifestation of that when the director of the CDC came out and said, you know, that the science shows it’s safe to reopen schools without everyone being vaccinated. And in a matter of hours, really, the Biden administration had come out and said, ‘Well, she (the director) was speaking for herself,’ which gave you a sense of how afraid the Biden administration, newly in power, is of what the teachers’ unions say,” continued Hume.

Hume laid blame on “the effect of the media coverage in particular, and of a lot of the pronouncements of public health officials as well” for the “nation’s attitude” on allowing children back to school.

This narrative was, according to Hume, “very powerful and the sense of fear that it engendered in the American body politick has been the strongest thing we’ve seen, really, in terms of people’s unwillingness to face the data as it became clearer and clearer.”

“Scientists have said, almost in (sic) the beginning, that this is a disease that way disproportionately affects the elderly and those with certain attendant comorbidities, and that everyone else was, if not completely safe against the disease, then largely so.” Click Here To Read!!

Four Charged in $32 Million Health Care Fraud Scheme

Tuesday, March 2, 2021
Department of Justice
Office of Public Affairs
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A medical director, operator and two unlicensed practitioners at a Texas medical clinic are now in custody on charges related to their alleged participation in a $32 million health care fraud scheme.

Farrah Forough Farizani, D.O., 57, Hamid Reza Razavi, 60, Elie Hanna Hajjar, 48, and Juan Acuña, 64, all of Houston, made their appearances today before U.S. Magistrate Judge Christina Bryan.

Farizani and Razavi are the medical director and operator, respectively, of Hillcroft Physicians, while Hajjar and Acuña were former unlicensed practitioners there.

The indictment, unsealed today, charges all four with one count of conspiracy to commit health care fraud. Farizani, Razavi and Hajjar are also charged with five counts of making false statements relating to health care matters.

The indictment alleges the defendants participated in a health care fraud scheme. They allegedly submitted false and fraudulent claims to Medicaid and Medicare for services that were not provided as billed or were not provided by a licensed, qualified and enrolled provider. Farizani, Razavi, Hajjar, and Acuña allegedly misled patients and staff to believe that Hajjar and Acuña were licensed to practice medicine in Texas.

According to the indictment, Farizani and Razavi directed Hajjar and Acuña to pose as licensed medical professionals. Hajjar and Acuña then allegedly examined, diagnosed, treated, referred and prescribed drugs for patients, many of whom were non-English speaking Medicaid clients unfamiliar with the American medical system. Farizani and Razavi allegedly directed Hillcroft Physicians’ billing staff to submit false claims to Medicaid and Medicare as though Farizani had seen and treated the patients, even when Farizani was out of the country.

The indictment alleges that the defendants submitted or caused the submission of approximately $31 million in claims to Medicaid for which Medicaid paid approximately $12.2 million. They also submitted approximately $600,000 in claims to Medicare for which Medicare paid approximately $250,000.

Acting Assistant Attorney General Nicholas L. McQuaid of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division; Acting U.S. Attorney Jennifer B. Lowery of the Southern District of Texas; Special Agent in Charge Perrye K. Turner of the FBI’s Houston Field Office; Special Agent in Charge Miranda Bennett of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General’s (HHS-OIG) Dallas Region; and Stormy Kelly of the Texas Attorney General’s Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (MFCU) made the announcement.

The FBI, HHS-OIG and Texas Attorney General’s MFCU conducted the investigation. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations assisted with the arrests.

Trial Attorney Devon Helfmeyer of the Criminal Division’s Fraud Section and Special Assistant U.S. Attorney Kathryn Olson of the Southern District of Texas are prosecuting the case.

The Fraud Section leads the Health Care Fraud Strike Force. Since its inception in March 2007, the Health Care Fraud Strike Force, which maintains 15 strike forces operating in 24 districts, has charged more than 4,200 defendants who have collectively billed the Medicare program for nearly $19 billion. In addition, the HHS Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, working in conjunction with the HHS-OIG, are taking steps to increase accountability and decrease the presence of fraudulent providers.

An indictment is merely an allegation and all defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

“Why was this happening? #Mental #illness caused by #coronavirus #lockdowns.”

“For the age group 13 to 18 in April 2020, insurance claims for generalized anxiety disorder increased 93.6 percent. As a percentage of all medical claims in April of 2019, major depressive disorder claims increased 83.9 percent and adjustment disorder claims by 89.7 percent.”

Concluding from the above, Carlson made the grim observation that “children are 10 times more likely to die from suicide than from the coronavirus they’re meant to be protected from.”

“That is the new normal that Andrew Cuomo and The New York Times are working to make permanent in this country,” he stated.

Carlson flagged the extreme-leftist teachers’ unions of America as perpetuating the lockdown problem, noting in particular the president of the Los Angeles Teachers’ Union, Cecily Myart-Cruz, who said, “Some voices are being allowed to speak louder than others. We have to call out the privilege behind the largely white, wealthy parents driving the push for a rushed return.”

Matt Meyer, the head of the Berkeley teachers’ union, also came under fire after it was revealed by a group of parents that he has been sending his children to private school for in-person education, defying his own public advocacy for the shutdown of public schools.

Speaking in January, Meyer said, “Real-life children do not keep their masks on, they do not keep distance from each other or their teachers. Given the realities of working with real children in person, we need to account for the inevitable lapses in risk mitigation practices by choosing a standard of lower transmission for reopening.”

Dr. Marty Makary, professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the Bloomberg School of Health, told Carlson that “public health research always lags behind reality. … We’re going to see a lot of research come out on the restrictions, particularly against kids, and this is the first of many research studies and it looks pretty grim.”

Using the national FAIR Health study, Makary lamented the “91 percent increase in kids, Tucker, who come to us as doctors because they tried to hurt themselves at a time when all medical utilization has been cut in half.” He noted there has been a “300 percent increase in some parts of the country where there are very strict restrictions against kids and school closures.” Click Here To Read!!

Video: CHILD TRAFFIC SURVIVOR REVEALS BIG NAME #PEDOPHILES – THE VIEWS HATRED OF DONALD #TRUMP – WHY?

wil paranormal
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Child trafficking is Big News around the world, but not a mention of it on Mainstream Media – THE BIG COVERUP to Protect their Own

The statistics therein demonstrate that “kids are depressed and dejected and they are regressing.”

“The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on mental health, particularly that of young people. School closures, having to learn remotely, and isolating from friends due to social distancing have been sources of stress and loneliness,” Carlson said.

“Among children aged 13 to 18 – teenagers – insurance claims for intentional self-harm were up 90 percent in March of 2020 compared to the previous year. The next month, in April, self-harm cases rose by nearly 100 percent.”

Continuing, Carlson drew attention to the astronomical rise in “claims for medical help related to drug overdoses,” which rose by “95 percent in March and then to 119 percent in April, and those numbers remained elevated through the fall.” Click Here To Read!!

“Just imagining if I was in that situation right now, I think the #suicide attempt would have happened a lot earlier, and probably I think I would have succeeded.”

Sun, Feb 28, 2021, 06:01
Motoko Rich, Hikari Hida
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Writing about her challenges, Nao, who is now married, said she wanted to help others who might be feeling desperate, particularly at a time when so many people are sequestered from friends and colleagues. “Knowing someone went through or is going through something similar as you – and knowing that someone is seeking professional help for that and that it actually helped – would encourage people to do a similar thing,” said Nao, who said she wanted to help remove the taboos associated with mental illness in Japan.

Nao’s husband could see how much she struggled with the long working hours and brutal office culture at the consulting firm where they first met. Then, when she quit, she felt adrift.

During the pandemic, women have suffered disproportionate job losses. They made up the bulk of employees within the industries most affected by infection control measures, including restaurants, bars and hotels.

About half of all working women hold part-time or contract jobs, and when business flatlined, companies cut those employees first. In the first nine months of last year, 1.44 million such workers lost their jobs, more than half of them women.

I just felt like I lost everything
Although Nao quit her consulting job voluntarily to seek psychiatric treatment, she remembers feeling wracked with insecurity, no longer able to pay her rent. When she and her then fiance decided to accelerate their wedding plans, her father accused her of being selfish. “I just felt like I lost everything,” she recalled.

Those feelings, she said, triggered the depression that led to her suicide attempt. After spending some time in a psychiatric hospital and continuing medication, her self-confidence improved. She found a four-day-a-week job working in the digital operation of a magazine group and is now able to manage the workload.

In the past, suicide rates in Japan have spiked during times of economic crisis, including after the burst of the property-based bubble in the 1990s and the global downturn in 2008. During those periods, it was men who were most affected by job losses and who killed themselves at higher rates. Historically, suicides among men in Japan have outnumbered those among women by a factor of at least two to one.

Kids now 10 times more likely to die from #suicide than #COVID, Tucker reveals in devastating monologue

A FAIR Health study indicated that insurance claims for self-harm were up 90 percent last March and drug overdoses up 119 percent last April among teens.

On Tuesday’s Tucker Carlson Tonight, the eponymous host exposed many of the ills emanating from lockdown restrictions, including the devastating effect wrought on American children, whom he noted are now “10 times more likely to die from suicide than from the coronavirus they’re meant to be protected from.”

During a blistering opening monologue, Carlson referenced a recently published FAIR Health study, The Impact of COVID-19 on Pediatric Mental Health, which highlights the developments in the mental health of children as a result of locking down the country. Click Here To Read!!

“#Women have to look after their families’ health, and they have to look after cleanliness and can get looked down upon if they are not doing it right.”

Sun, Feb 28, 2021, 06:01
Motoko Rich, Hikari Hida
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In one widely publicised account, a 30-something woman who had been recuperating from the virus at home killed herself. The Japanese media seized on her note expressing anguish over the possibility that she had infected others and caused them trouble, while experts questioned whether shame may have driven her to despair.

We don’t basically support you if you are not ‘one of us’
“Unfortunately, the current tendency is to blame the victim,” said Michiko Ueda, an associate professor of political science at Waseda University in Tokyo who has researched suicide. Ueda found in surveys last year that 40 per cent of respondents worried about social pressure if they contracted the virus. “We don’t basically support you if you are not ‘one of us’,” said Ueda. “And if you have mental health issues you are not one of us.”

Experts have also worried that a succession of Japanese film and television stars who took their own lives last year may have spurred a string of copycat suicides. After Yuko Takeuchi, a popular, award-winning actress, took her life in late September, the number of women taking their own lives in the following month jumped by close to 90 per cent compared to the previous year.

Shortly after Takeuchi’s death, Nao (30) started writing a blog to chronicle her lifelong battles with depression and eating disorders. She wrote candidly about her suicide attempt three years earlier.

Such openness about mental health struggles is still relatively rare in Japan. The celebrity suicides prompted Nao, whose family name has been withheld at her request to protect her privacy, to reflect on how she might have reacted if she had hit her emotional nadir during the pandemic. “When you’re at home alone, you feel very isolated from society and that feeling is really painful,” she said.