#Kruger emphasized that palliative care offered a “far better solution” than the “dystopia” of euthanasia and announced that he and like-minded colleagues were launching a new group to fight attempts to change the law.

Tue May 4, 2021
By Raymond Wolfe

The same day, 70 MPs and peers signed a letter to the Lord Chancellor Robert Buckland, outlining “grave concerns about the renewed calls to change the law on assisted suicide and euthanasia.”

“We do not consider that a new inquiry into this complex and emotive subject is warranted,” they said, noting that Parliament had rejected legalization of assisted suicide by more than 200 votes in 2015. “The matter has been extensively investigated since the 2004 inquiry led by the former Lord Chancellor Lord Mackay,” they added.

“Euthanasia is, sadly, the natural destination for a law allowing assisted suicide, which replaces what we have now – a law based on the rational and widely-accepted principle that we do not involve ourselves in deliberately bringing about the deaths of others – with a law based on artificial and arbitrary criteria like a prognosis of terminal illness,” the letter continued.

Doctors who assist in a patient’s suicide in the U.K. can face up to 14 years in prison. The British health system nevertheless has won international condemnation for its radical end-of-life practices that led to the recent killings of 2-year-old Alfie Evans and an unnamed Polish man known as RS. An estimated tens of thousands of deaths due to starvation or dehydration have occurred in British hospitals since 2000.

Meanwhile, in Ontario, a doctor recently spoke out about how elderly patients are losing the will to live thanks to draconian lockdowns that have forced them into isolation. Some are requesting assisted suicide, she said.

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“Why was this happening? #Mental #illness caused by #coronavirus #lockdowns.”

“For the age group 13 to 18 in April 2020, insurance claims for generalized anxiety disorder increased 93.6 percent. As a percentage of all medical claims in April of 2019, major depressive disorder claims increased 83.9 percent and adjustment disorder claims by 89.7 percent.”

Concluding from the above, Carlson made the grim observation that “children are 10 times more likely to die from suicide than from the coronavirus they’re meant to be protected from.”

“That is the new normal that Andrew Cuomo and The New York Times are working to make permanent in this country,” he stated.

Carlson flagged the extreme-leftist teachers’ unions of America as perpetuating the lockdown problem, noting in particular the president of the Los Angeles Teachers’ Union, Cecily Myart-Cruz, who said, “Some voices are being allowed to speak louder than others. We have to call out the privilege behind the largely white, wealthy parents driving the push for a rushed return.”

Matt Meyer, the head of the Berkeley teachers’ union, also came under fire after it was revealed by a group of parents that he has been sending his children to private school for in-person education, defying his own public advocacy for the shutdown of public schools.

Speaking in January, Meyer said, “Real-life children do not keep their masks on, they do not keep distance from each other or their teachers. Given the realities of working with real children in person, we need to account for the inevitable lapses in risk mitigation practices by choosing a standard of lower transmission for reopening.”

Dr. Marty Makary, professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the Bloomberg School of Health, told Carlson that “public health research always lags behind reality. … We’re going to see a lot of research come out on the restrictions, particularly against kids, and this is the first of many research studies and it looks pretty grim.”

Using the national FAIR Health study, Makary lamented the “91 percent increase in kids, Tucker, who come to us as doctors because they tried to hurt themselves at a time when all medical utilization has been cut in half.” He noted there has been a “300 percent increase in some parts of the country where there are very strict restrictions against kids and school closures.” Click Here To Read!!

“Just imagining if I was in that situation right now, I think the #suicide attempt would have happened a lot earlier, and probably I think I would have succeeded.”

Sun, Feb 28, 2021, 06:01
Motoko Rich, Hikari Hida
Click Here To Read!!

Writing about her challenges, Nao, who is now married, said she wanted to help others who might be feeling desperate, particularly at a time when so many people are sequestered from friends and colleagues. “Knowing someone went through or is going through something similar as you – and knowing that someone is seeking professional help for that and that it actually helped – would encourage people to do a similar thing,” said Nao, who said she wanted to help remove the taboos associated with mental illness in Japan.

Nao’s husband could see how much she struggled with the long working hours and brutal office culture at the consulting firm where they first met. Then, when she quit, she felt adrift.

During the pandemic, women have suffered disproportionate job losses. They made up the bulk of employees within the industries most affected by infection control measures, including restaurants, bars and hotels.

About half of all working women hold part-time or contract jobs, and when business flatlined, companies cut those employees first. In the first nine months of last year, 1.44 million such workers lost their jobs, more than half of them women.

I just felt like I lost everything
Although Nao quit her consulting job voluntarily to seek psychiatric treatment, she remembers feeling wracked with insecurity, no longer able to pay her rent. When she and her then fiance decided to accelerate their wedding plans, her father accused her of being selfish. “I just felt like I lost everything,” she recalled.

Those feelings, she said, triggered the depression that led to her suicide attempt. After spending some time in a psychiatric hospital and continuing medication, her self-confidence improved. She found a four-day-a-week job working in the digital operation of a magazine group and is now able to manage the workload.

In the past, suicide rates in Japan have spiked during times of economic crisis, including after the burst of the property-based bubble in the 1990s and the global downturn in 2008. During those periods, it was men who were most affected by job losses and who killed themselves at higher rates. Historically, suicides among men in Japan have outnumbered those among women by a factor of at least two to one.

Kids now 10 times more likely to die from #suicide than #COVID, Tucker reveals in devastating monologue

A FAIR Health study indicated that insurance claims for self-harm were up 90 percent last March and drug overdoses up 119 percent last April among teens.

On Tuesday’s Tucker Carlson Tonight, the eponymous host exposed many of the ills emanating from lockdown restrictions, including the devastating effect wrought on American children, whom he noted are now “10 times more likely to die from suicide than from the coronavirus they’re meant to be protected from.”

During a blistering opening monologue, Carlson referenced a recently published FAIR Health study, The Impact of COVID-19 on Pediatric Mental Health, which highlights the developments in the mental health of children as a result of locking down the country. Click Here To Read!!

“#Women have to look after their families’ health, and they have to look after cleanliness and can get looked down upon if they are not doing it right.”

Sun, Feb 28, 2021, 06:01
Motoko Rich, Hikari Hida
Click Here To Read!!

In one widely publicised account, a 30-something woman who had been recuperating from the virus at home killed herself. The Japanese media seized on her note expressing anguish over the possibility that she had infected others and caused them trouble, while experts questioned whether shame may have driven her to despair.

We don’t basically support you if you are not ‘one of us’
“Unfortunately, the current tendency is to blame the victim,” said Michiko Ueda, an associate professor of political science at Waseda University in Tokyo who has researched suicide. Ueda found in surveys last year that 40 per cent of respondents worried about social pressure if they contracted the virus. “We don’t basically support you if you are not ‘one of us’,” said Ueda. “And if you have mental health issues you are not one of us.”

Experts have also worried that a succession of Japanese film and television stars who took their own lives last year may have spurred a string of copycat suicides. After Yuko Takeuchi, a popular, award-winning actress, took her life in late September, the number of women taking their own lives in the following month jumped by close to 90 per cent compared to the previous year.

Shortly after Takeuchi’s death, Nao (30) started writing a blog to chronicle her lifelong battles with depression and eating disorders. She wrote candidly about her suicide attempt three years earlier.

Such openness about mental health struggles is still relatively rare in Japan. The celebrity suicides prompted Nao, whose family name has been withheld at her request to protect her privacy, to reflect on how she might have reacted if she had hit her emotional nadir during the pandemic. “When you’re at home alone, you feel very isolated from society and that feeling is really painful,” she said.

This is not how we manage an outbreak :

By United Health Professionals
Global Research, February 18, 2021
United Health Professionals
Click Here To Read More!!

– « The world went mad » with coronavirus lockdowns which « fly in the face of what is known about handling virus pandemics » (Dr Anders Tegnell, Sweden’s chief epidemiologist, June 24, 2020).

– « The infection fatality rate seems to be about the same as for influenza, but we have never introduced these drastic measures before, when we had influenza pandemics. And we cannot live with them for years to come » (Prof. Peter Gøtzsche, December 1, 2020).

– « The decision of lockdown as the decision of wearing masks…are not based on scientific data…» (Prof. Didier Raoult, June 24, 2020).

– « The natural history of the virus [the coronavirus] is not influenced by social measures [lockdown, face masks, closure of restaurants, curfew, etc.]…The lockdown did not trigger the decrease in cases…As for the closure of restaurants which had very strict health protocols in place…of course, I have no way of defending it…it has not influenced the epidemic at all…The lockdown has not changed anything…» (Prof. Philippe Parola, December 3, 2020).

– « There is no scientific evidence to support the disastrous two-metre rule. Poor quality research is being used to justify a policy with enormous consequences for us all » (Professors Carl Heneghan and Tom Jefferson, June 19, 2020).

– « Grotesque, absurd and very dangerous measures…a horrible impact on the world economy…self- destruction and collective suicide… » (Prof. Sucharit Bhakdi, March 2020. He also sent, at the time, a letter to German Chancellor Angela Merkel).

In addition, these tyrannical measures violate the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in its articles: 3, 5, 9, 12, 13, 17, 18, 20, 26, 27, 28, 30 and the UNICEF Convention on the Rights of the Child in its articles : 28, 29, 32, 37.

– « When the state knows best and violates human rights, we are on a dangerous course. The pandemic has led to the violation of basic human rights…There has not been the slightest ethical analysis of whether this was justified. It is not» (Prof. Peter Gøtzsche, December 4, 2020).